pain au thanksgiving

11.14 turkey pain 2

I know that by now we have seen every possible use of Thanksgiving leftovers under the sun. We’ve seen them in pies, in soups, in sandwiches, and in salads, but one I had not seen was this masterpiece.

Imagine, if you will, your Thanksgiving leftovers tightly wrapped in a croissant dough and baked to perfection.  I think my knees just went weak…

May I present to you Pain au Thanksgiving! It’s very similar to its cousin pain au chocolate but instead of being filled with chocolate, it is filled with an entire Thanksgiving dinner … all rolled up into flaky buttery croissant dough… which is where it has apparently always belonged.

As soon as I got this idea I couldn’t wait to make it. I knew that I had to do it before Thanksgiving, so that you could use it for your leftovers. Of course, the added bonus of me getting to eat TWO Thanksgiving dinners this month may have weighed on my decision as well.

11.14 turkey pain 2.2

For these, I used a standard croissant dough (you can use your own favorite recipe, I used this one only because I had successfully used it before). If you’re short on time (or motivation) you could even use store-bought puff pastry or some of those refrigerated “crescent” rolls in a pinch. Just keep in mind that a different dough may yield a different amount of pastries. My recipe yielded 24 pastries each one about 4 by 2 inches when baked.

For the filling, I used turkey, stuffing, and mashed potatoes. I toyed with the idea of putting the gravy inside, but decided it would a> be too messy and b> be much better alongside the sandwich. Because, if there’s one thing I love more than a sandwich, it’s a sandwich with a jus for dipping.

I also opted to leave out the cranberry sauce since Mr. Eats turned his nose up at it. You’re welcome to include it if your guests are more cranberry-friendly – I personally think it would have been delicious stuffed inside or even drizzled on top as a glaze.

If you’re wondering what on earth you are going to do with 24 thanksgiving pastries, fear not! You can freeze the pains (baked or raw) and keep enjoying that turkey dinner for up to three months.

11.14 turkey 0055

 

Pain au Thanksgiving

Yield: 24 Pain au Thanksgivings                                                                  [  Printable Recipe ]

Time: 1 hour (prep), 8 – 18 hours (refrigeration), 15 – 20 minutes (baking)

For the croissant dough:

  • 1 1/2 cups milk, warm (105°F–110°F)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1 Tablespoon + 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 3 3/4 cups all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 1 Tablespoon kosher salt
  • 3 sticks unsalted butter

For the filling:

  • Thanksgiving leftovers: turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, whatever you want!

Baking & Serving: 

  • 1 egg beaten with 1 Tablespoon water
  • Gravy, for serving

Directions

Making the dough:
1. In the stand of an electric mixer with a dough hook attachment, mix the milk, sugar, and yeast. Let sit until foamy (appx 5 min). In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour and salt, set aside until yeast has foamed.
2. Add flour/salt mixture to yeast, while mixing on low. (I usually add half, then once incorporated add the rest)
3. Once it comes together into a smooth, slightly sticky mass, shape it into a rectangle about 1 ½ inches thick, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and set in the fridge for about an hour until chilled

Laminating the dough:

1. Once dough is chilled, line up sticks of butter and smash with a rolling pin between two sheets of parchment paper until they are roughly the shape of an 8 x 5 inch rectangle. Wrap and chill, swapping butter for dough in the fridge.croissant 1
2. Unwrap dough and roll out onto a lightly floured surface, dusting with flour as necessary* into a 16 x 10 in rectangle. Arrange dough w shortest side nearest you, put butter rectangle in the center, and fold like a letter—cover the butter with the bottom 1/3rd of dough first, then with the top. Brush off any excess flour with a pastry brush.

3. Turn dough 90 degrees so new shortest side is near you, then pound with a rolling pin at even intervals, making uniform impressions (this will help the butter to spread). Roll dough again into a 15 x 10 inch rectangle. Brush off any excess flour, and fold in thirds again, stretching the dough as needed to square off the ends—thus forming a 3 layer 10 x 5 inch rectangle.

dsc08507

4. Give yourself a congratulatory pat on the back for doing your (presumably) first ever “fold”, rewrap the dough in plastic wrap, and stick it back in the fridge at least another hour. (I’m not going to lie, I got a little impatient and may not have waited the whole hour… on that same note, I also left the house a while between another fold and it was in for over an hour, and alas the world has not come to an end)

5. Repeat 5 & 6 three more times, creating a total of 4 “folds”. Once you have completed your last fold, rewrap the dough and place in refrigerator for 8 – 18 hours.

When you’re ready to shape the Pain au Thanksgiving

1. Remove dough from refrigerator, unwrap and cut in half cross-wise. Re-wrap half of dough and place back in the fridge. Just look at all those buttery layers…

11.14 turkey 0278

2. Roll on lightly floured surface into a 16 x 12 inch rectangle, stretching as needed to maintain rectangular shape

11.14 turkey 0280
3. Cut into 4 by 4 inch squares. Stretch each square so that it is slightly elongated and place a small amount of filling of your choice into the center. If you go over 2 tablespoons of filling you will probably have a hard time rolling it into shape.

11.14 turkey 0285

4. Fold one side over the filling and wet it slightly with some water. Fold the other side over and press down firmly to seal.*

5. Place onto a parchment-lined half sheet pan, seam side down. Continue with remaining squares, I was able to fit 8 onto each pan. Once the pan is filled cover with plastic wrap or a kitchen towel and set in a warm spot to proof until doubled in size 1 to 2 hours.

6. Remove other half from fridge and repeat the steps again.

 

 

Baking: 

When ready to bake, preheat oven to 375F and make an egg wash by whisking one egg with 1 tablespoon water.
Right before you put the dough into the oven, brush with egg wash. If you feel so inclined, you can sprinkle some shredded cheese on top for added flavor. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes until well-browned.

Notes:

To freeze raw:

Once you have filled and sealed the dough, you can place them seam-side down on a small baking sheet (that will fit in the freezer) and cover lightly with plastic wrap. Freeze for 1 hour until firm, then transfer to a freezer-safe Ziploc bag and return to freezer until ready to bake.

To freeze cooked:
Wrap cooled pains tightly in foil and place into a freezer-proof Ziploc bag.

To bake from frozen (un-baked):
Place frozen dough on parchment-lined sheet and cover with plastic wrap.Place on counter to rise overnight about 8 to 10 hours. Once doubled in size paint with egg wash prior to baking.

If you freeze croissants pre-baked:
Frozen croissants can be thawed overnight prior to reheating or taken from the freezer directly to the oven, in which case they will need a few minutes more to reheat.  Bake for 10 minutes at 375F from thawed, add a few extra minutes if baking from frozen.

 

 

 

thursday things – the 2014 thanksgiving special!

1290198334976_9077383

Take a walk down memory lane with 20 years of Thanksgiving food trends.

Did you know that you could celebrate a fast food Thanksgiving (think “semi-homemade” – Sandra would be proud)… sadly that stuffing actually sounds really freaking good.

Meanwhile Food52 comes to the aid of your gluten-free guests.

King Arthur Flour answers the age-old question about what makes the best pie crust: Butter or Shortening? (Hint: IT’S BUTTER!)

New York Times has Thanksgiving across the states – what is your states dish? Arizona’s is apparently cranberry sauce with chiles.

And The Kitchn showed us how to make our entire Thanksgiving meal in the slow cooker. Of course, then you would need like six slow cookers, but who’s counting?

This Philly delicatessen has turkey-shaped mozzarella.

2014_pastificio12.0.0

And Salt & Straw has released a turkey flavored ice cream… that supposedly is actually pretty good.

Make your life easier on Turkey Day and cut down on those tears by nuking those onions before you chop them.

And DON’T BASTE THAT TURKEY because if Alton Brown doesn’t do it then neither should you.

If you still need to stock up on Thanksgiving gear, check out last year’s Thanksgiving Survival Kit with all the gear you need to get you through the holiday unscathed.

If you are heading out to the grocery store, Serious Eats will hook you up with a a printable list of your Thanksgiving pantry essentials.

Thanksgiving Recipe Roundup

The turkey is sacred territory to pretty much everyone out there, so I won’t touch that one with a ten foot pole. I will, however, give you some side dish ideas! This year hubby’s dad is making the turkey, so side dishes are all we need to worry about anyway!

Last year I made this sweet potato casserole recipe from Some Kitchen Stories and it was delicious.

sweet_potato_1

This classic sage and sausage stuffing from Serious Eats is sure to please your Turkey Day guests.

20101117-stuffing-thumb-625xauto-123404

Though Thanksgiving isn’t generally a time for experiments, I’d definitely give these slow cooker mashed potatoes from Gimme Some Oven a whirl

Slow-Cooker-Mashed-Potatoes-2

Of course it’s always good to have a nice, light salad on hand, but you don’t want it to be boring. That’s where A Periodic Table’s Asian Pear & Fennel Salad comes into play.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

And let’s diverge from that murky green bean casserole and enjoy some of Pink Parsley’s crispy green bean fries instead.

green bean fries

I’m obligated to make this praline pumpkin cake every year or else Mr. Eats will kill me… in fact it may have been in the fine print of our marriage contract. “Must make pumpkin cake at least once a year”..  If you want to go the more traditional route, try the creamiest pumpkin pie in the world.

praline pumpkin cake

 

And don’t forget to make miniature versions of everything to serve to your hamster.

thursday things – the chestnut praline latte and other things

chestnut praline latte

THE CHESTNUT PRALINE LATTE HAS ARRIVED. I tried it this morning just for you all… and the verdict? Actually pretty good. I’ve never had a chestnut but I assume that is what they taste like. It was nutty with a slight hint of cinnamon and all in all, I would say it was pretty good. I would definitely order it again.

In other news… 

If you’ve ever wondered what it was like to be 2 years old, this Instagram account will remind you.

And if you thought plant-sitting was a boring job, you have clearly been doing it wrong.

If you had a bad day yesterday, remember it could always be worse

Just seeing this picture of a life-sized Katniss cake makes me tired. You don’t even get to eat it! WHAT’S THE POINT?

Not a baker? No problem. Bon Appetit has you covered with storebought pies you don’t have to be ashamed to take to your gathering.

For some reason, Pepsi thinks that Dorito-flavored soda is necessary.

For a much more obvious reasons, Oreo churros are (going to be) a thing.

Phoenix has some serious brag-worthy restaurants and I have only been to two of them… Clearly I need to work on that.

Hosting Thanksgiving at your place? Just taking along a side or dessert? This Thanksgiving Food Planning Calculator will help you figure out how much you need to make!

Oh, and Mr. Eats sent me this today because “It reminded him of me”… Thanks, Mr. Eats.

KZNujES - Imgur

 

m4s0n501

olga bread

olga bread 0185

Back home we have this restaurant called Olga’s Kitchen. It’s nothing fancy, but it was located in our town’s main shopping mall, which means I spent a fair amount of time there in my youth.

The main draw of Olga’s Kitchen is their “Olga Bread.” Olga Bread is an extremely soft, pliable, slightly sweet, pocketless flatbread. They serve their gyros, shawarma, and even ham and cheese enveloped in this warm, fluffy stuff, but my favorite way to eat it was always just straight up.

While I was waxing nostalgic to one of my aunts about Olgas, she mentioned to me that she had a recipe for the famed bread and would be happy to share it with me. Skeptical as I am about pretty much all recipes, I knew she wouldn’t steer me wrong… and she didn’t. The result was pretty darn close to the real thing.

I used butter in place of the margarine called for in the recipe, since I don’t own margarine and reading a recipe before I make it is way too much work. The butter gave the bread a more buttery flavor, but I think using margarine would have extended their shelf life as these were a bit stiff by day two. That being said, a few minutes in a preheated oven made them good as new, but if you want to give the recipe a shot with margarine be my guest.

I used our Olga breads to hold our chicken wraps, and then it masqueraded as a naan-replacement to dip into a saucy dinner the next night.

I haven’t been there in years, but Olga’s Kitchen is still around (I looked it up) and is apparently only located in Ohio & Michigan, which means making this recipe is about as close as you are likely to get to the real thing.

olga bread

Prep Time: 50 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours

Yield: 16 rounds

Ingredients

  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter or margarine, melted (see notes)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup lukewarm water (105 - 115F degrees)
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 4 cups flour, divided

Instructions

  1. Heat milk to a simmer, then remove from heat. Add honey and butter and pour into a large bowl to cool.
  2. In a small bowl stir sugar into warm water and add yeas packet. Set aside to bloom, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add 1 cup flour to milk mixture and stir well.
  4. Add egg and yeast mixture to flour mixture; stir to combine.
  5. Add additional 1 cup flour and stir to combine. Continue adding flour, 1/4 or 1/2 cup at a time, until sticky dough is formed, don't worry if you don't use all of the flour.
  6. Turn dough out onto a floured surface and knead for 2 minutes until it forms a smooth and cohesive ball. The dough will still be quite loose and sticky, this is how you want it to be, DO NOT add more flour.
  7. Pour 1 tablespoon of neutral vegetable oil into a large bowl and place dough into bowl. Toss once to coat and cover bowl with plastic wrap. Place in a warm place until dough has doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  8. When ready to form dough, punch dough down and divide into 16 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a thin circle, about 8 inches in diameter. I found this was easiest to do by covering the top of the dough with plastic wrap while rolling, which prevented the sticky dough from attaching itself to my rolling pin. Then, I layered each round between plastic wrap to keep from sticking together.
  9. When ready to cook, heat a 10-inch dry skillet (or griddle pan) over medium-high heat.
  10. Drop dough onto pan and cook for about 20-.30 seconds per side. The first side will be well-browned and the second side will be more splotchy. Transfer to towel-lined plate to keep warm while cooking the rest.
  11. Store in an airtight container at room temperature. After the first day, bread is best served reheated in the oven or on a skillet to restore its soft, pliable texture. After the second day, any unused bread can be frozen in an freezer-safe bag and reheated for later use.

Notes

*I used butter in place of margarine which gave the bread a more buttery flavor, but I think using margarine would have extended their shelf life as these were a bit stiff by day two. This is easily remedied by reheating the olga bread to restore pliability.

*I made this by hand, using a spatula and a bowl, because I was too lazy to take out my mixer. You could definitely cut down on prep time by using a stand mixer with a paddle attachment or dough hook, if desired.

http://wee-eats.com/2014/11/11/olga-bread/

thursday things

scottsdale farmers market

It’s my favorite time of year here in Phoenix – FARMER’S MARKET SEASON! I mean, we have farmers markets during the rest of the year but it’s so unbearably hot out that they are only open from like 7:00 am to 11:00 am and even then you’re roasting in the heat for any amount of time you spend there… This weekend, though, we actually spent some time in the 70s (degrees, that is) and were able to sneak out to my favorite local farmer’s market.

Mr. Eats won second place in Movita’s pumpkin carving contest! He has gone up a few points in my book. Almost every judge, though loving his pumpkin, mentioned that they didn’t know “what an Oogie Boogie” was, so let take a moment to educate everyone…

Oogie Boogie is a ‘villain’ in The Nightmare Before Christmas. In the movie, Jack Skellington (whom Mr. Eats carved into his pumpkin last year, coincidentally enough) from Halloween Town captures Santa Claus in a misguided attempt to take over Christmas. I’m pretty sure it’s probably streaming on Netflix or Amazon Prime so give it a watch in your downtime. :)

You can catch out Oogie’s sweet dance moves in the video below.

Starbucks is releasing a new drink this holiday season – set to make its nationwide debut November 12th.

Chef Daniel Patterson shows us how to cook in our sleep.

Texas BBQ has finally made it to Paris, France.

This lady decided to take the frugal route to the paleo diet… by eating dog food. (That’s commitment.)

And Jimmy Kimmel’s annual birth control video… I mean, Halloween candy trick video…

If you’re still drowning in Halloween candy – here is the cure to your woes.

Otherwise, apparently you can sell your Halloween candy to your dentist.

I need this cracker plate. I think it would be an excellent blog prop, don’t you agree?

19377b2d1e3b5f8442ae722bf9bcc42f

Carl’s Jr. has taken their sexy cheeseburger ads to a whole new level.

Shannon knocked it out of the park on her Feast feature this month. I want every single item in that spread. Thank god I don’t have the paper version or it would be covered in drool…

And @kawanabesatou is creating internet magic by tweeting pictures of hamsters in every day situations

… like serving sushi

hamster sushi

… or tending bar

hamster bar

And… Since I didn’t get to it last week…

The best things I ate in October

Enchiladas (and salsa, and cheese dip, and everything else) from this tiny Mexican restaurant located in a strip mall in the middle of nowhere in Braselton, Georgia… I was extremely surprised since I was at least 60% sure it was going to be horrible and 30% prepared for extreme gastrointestinal distress… neither of which proved to be true.

el centinela

Dominique Ansel’s banana bread… recreated in my own kitchen.

banana bread

The goma ramen from Posh Scottsdale‘s ramen night (every Tuesday, folks!)

ramen posh

Carne asada tacos from America’s Taco Shop, which has several locations around Phoenix (one of which, I recently discovered, was actually not far from my house!).

taco shop