vanilla bean macarons

berry macaron | wee eats

Macarons are probably the most finnicky cookie you will ever come across. So, in my laziness, I was overjoyed to learn that I could find them in freezer section of my local Trader Joe’s store. Of course, curiosity will always get the better of me, so I had to try to make them on my own.

This was not the first time I had made macarons, I made them successfully years ago, less successfully once after that, super unsuccessfully about a month and a half ago (That was the recipe’s fault, not mine. Well, my fault for not doing more research I suppose) and finally, this last time, super successfully. With the help of a small refresher from Sur La Table.

So, finally, the masochism paid off and I got my macarons. And they were delicious! So, to spare you the heartbreak of failure, let’s review what I have deemed to be important to your macaron success.

vanilla macaron | wee eats

1. Weigh your ingredients. You will find plenty of recipes that offer cups instead of grams. Just skip those all together. Honestly you should always be weighing things but I’m far too lazy for that so I opt for cups in almost all my recipes. Macarons, however, will not stand for that. They just won’t. So get out your scale and get to weighing. I have an older version of this one and it seems to work fine.

2. Sift, sift, sift! Large chunks do not a happy macaron make, so sift your almond/powdered sugar mixture through a fine mesh sieve and discard any large chunks that are left behind. Your cookies will thank you for it.

3. Gel colors only! Macarons are a very careful balancing act of liquid to solid ratio and you want to disturb that as little as possible. So, if you would like to color your macarons, opt for gel coloring and add it towards the end of your egg-beating (once you have just reached the stiff peak stage). Add more color than you think you need because the color will fade when the macarons bake. I use these colors. The macarons at the top of this page are really just vanilla shells with red gel coloring and berry filling.

4. Find the Goldilocks zone. Overmixing your macarons will give you a runny batter that is impossible to manage. Undermixing will result in a batter that is too thick and the macarons won’t spread or settle properly (you may notice that your macaron has a “point” after it is piped). Your batter should have the consistency of magma – not too thick and not too thin.

macaron magma gif

5. Use a real piping bag and tip. I’m forever cheap and try to avoid buying piping bags when I am convinced a Ziploc bag with the end cut off will do. This will NOT work with macarons (trust me, I’ve tried). It’s not worth the heartache, just cough up the cash for a couple tips and disposable bags and get on your way. I wouldn’t tell you to buy them if I didn’t think you needed them. I promise.

6. Hands off! After you have tapped your baking sheet to release the air bubbles, you can quickly pop any remaining bubbles you see with a toothpick if you like. But then it’s HANDS OFF for at least 30 minutes. Forming this skin is critical to creating the feet for your baby macarons so use this time to make your filling, preheat your oven, or to say a few prayers for your precious baby cookies. You will know enough time has passed when the tops have changed from shiny to dull and you can gently drag your finger across the top without any issue.

7. Time + Temperature are the two keys to success. (AKA: More Goldilocks stuff.) Remember to turn down your oven as soon as you put the macarons in. If you think you will forget this step, you can preheat to the baking temperature of 300F instead of the higher temperature. If you see your cookies are browning too fast, cover them with foil. If you think they’re cooking faster or slower than the specified time, go ahead and follow your instinct. If you over-bake the cookies, they will be dry and crumbly. If you under-bake them, they will be soft and gummy inside. You want a perfect balance of crisp shell with a chewy interior. It might take a few tries to get it right, but when in doubt I always err on the side of slightly under-baked.

Below you can see two sets of macarons – and the ones on the left are NOT chocolate. The left batch baked at too high of a temperature and over-browned. The others I lowered the oven temperature and covered with a bit of foil to prevent over-browning.

overbaked macaron

8. Be creative! You can get creative with your filling – don’t feel like making a buttercream? Go ahead and use a ganache instead, or simply spread a bit of jam or fruit curd between the cookies! Here I did a ring of buttercream with a dollop of jam in the middle.

macaron filling

 

9. Practice, practice, practice! If at first you don’t succeed, don’t be afraid to try again! Once you make them, you’ll see that they actually come together quite quickly and since you can freeze them you can have like a month’s supply of macarons at the end of all your hard work! I’m far from a macaron master, but I can confidently say that I can make a darn good macaron and plan to get plenty more practice to up my skill level to play with other flavors and techniques.

macaron practice

vanilla bean macarons

Ingredients

    For the macarons:
  • 110 grams almond flour
  • 200 grams confectioners sugar
  • 100 grams egg whites
  • 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla extract
  • 50 grams granulated sugar
  • For the vanilla filling:
  • 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste or extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • For strawberry filling
  • 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter
  • 1 1/4 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons strawberry jam
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

Instructions

    Make the Macarons
  1. Line two baking sheets with parchment and preheat the oven to 375F. YOU WILL TURN THIS DOWN WHEN YOU PUT THE MACARONS IN. DON'T FORGET TO TURN IT DOWN!
  2. Pulse the almond flour and confectioners’ sugar in the bowl of a food processor until finely ground and well blended.
  3. Sift almond mixture into a bowl (or onto a large sheet of parchment if you don't feel like dirtying another bowl. Discard any large chunks that will not go through the sieve.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the egg whites on medium-high speed until foamy, then scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean pod into the mixing bowl.
  5. Gradually add the granulated sugar and continue beating until a smooth, shiny meringue with stiff peaks forms, then add vanilla extract and beat a couple seconds more just to incorporate.
  6. Add 1/3 of the ground almond mixture to the meringue THIS IS WHERE YOU WANT TO BE VERY CAREFUL Over-mixing your batter will make it super runny and hard to work with, and your macarons won't get their tiny feet.
  7. Gently fold the 1/3 of almond mixture into the meringue until it is completely incorporated. Add remaining almond mixture and gently fold that in, it will take about 100 strokes (it sounds crazy, I know) - You want it to reach the consistency of "magma' (ha-ha!). So, it should be relatively thick, but still flow easily. When drizzled from above, the ribbon should sit on top of the remaining batter, then slowly be absorbed within about 2 seconds. Another way to check is to run your spatula down the center of the bowl, the two sides should "kiss" within about two seconds (see video in the post above).
  8. Transfer the batter to a piping bag fitted with a plain wide round tip (I used a 1/4 inch tip because it's all I could find). Pipe into small rounds spaced about 1 to 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets - you want to avoid "spiraling" while you pipe, just pipe into the center and allow the batter to flow outward on its own. Each round should be about 1-1½ inches in diameter.
  9. Once piped, bang your baking sheet on the counter about 2 to 3 times to release any air bubbles that are in the batter. Let sit out uncovered 30 minutes to an hour to form their "skin" - The skin is what will help them grow their feet! They are done when the tops are dull and you can touch them gently without leaving a mark.
  10. When ready to bake, turn the oven temperature down to 300F and place the macarons into the oven. I bake mine one sheet at a time (since sitting on the counter doesn't hurt anything). Bake anywhere from 10 to 15 minutes. If they start to brown too quickly, once they have their feet you can cover them with a sheet of foil and continue baking.
  11. When finished baking, place baking sheet on a wire rack and allow cookies to cool completely before moving. When ready to move, use an offset spatula to scrape under the cookies to remove them from the parchment.
  12. Match into approximate pairs that are similar in shape and size for filling.
  13. Make the filling(s):
  14. Using an electric mixer with the whisk attachment, beat butter on medium-high speed until it begins to become light and airy. Add powdered sugar, salt, and vanilla bean paste or extract and continue beating until the mixture is light and fluffy. Add jam (if using) and beat until fully incorporated.
  15. Scrape into piping bag and set aside until ready to pipe.
  16. Fill the cookies:
  17. Fill cookies by piping filling onto one cookie (I do use the spiral method for this, to ensure the filling reaches the edges) and gently pressing the top cookie onto the filling, flat side down.
  18. Once all cookies are filed, place into the freezer for at least 1 hour. I like to wrap mine individually in cello-wrap to keep them fresh and store them in the freezer. You may thaw cookies before eating. Store in refrigerator prior to serving.
http://wee-eats.com/2015/08/09/vanilla-bean-macarons/

[ See the original cookie recipe on Annie’s Eats ]

almond puff loaf

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Sometimes I get my inspiration from restaurants or a particular craving I have. Sometimes they just come to me from my wild imagination or another food blog. But sometimes, it’s literally sent to me… like this one which I received in my Sunday morning King Arthur Flour recipe e-mail. This recipe falls into the latter category.

This almond puff loaf looks fancy, with its layers of fluffy pastry and dense almond, but is actually incredibly easy to make. The texture is almost akin to that of a danish, but not nearly as sweet. The majority of the sweetness in this comes from the jam and icing on top, with the pastry merely serving as a vessel for the almond flavor and delightful flaky yet creamy texture.

You will need a mixer for this, unless you’ve been doing a lot of working out and have some crazy upper body strength. The first layer comes together after just a few minutes in the stand mixer, while the second layer starts off in a saucepan and is then transferred to the mixture and beat until cool. It will form a very thick batter that is spread on top of the bottom layer and then baked. You will want to use a large baking pan (I used a half sheet pan) for these as they will puff quite a bit in the oven. Once puffed and golden brown, you remove them from the oven and spread them with jam so it warms and melts and gets nice and gooey. Then, top with a drizzle of icing and you’re done!
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almond puff loaf

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Yield: 2 loaves

Ingredients

    For the bottom layer:
  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, cut into cubes, cold
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup water, room temperature
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • For the middle layer
  • 1 cup water, room temperature
  • 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • For the top layer
  • 2/3 cup jam or preserves
  • 1/2 cup slivered or sliced almonds, toasted (optional)
  • For the icing
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 Tablespoon milk

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350F and line a half sheet pan with parchment.
  2. Make the bottom layer
  3. In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the flour and salt.
  4. Cut butter into flour using a pastry blender (or hands) until everything is crumbly. Stir in water until the mixture forms a cohesive dough.
  5. Diving dough in half (each half should be about 4 5/8 ounces). Using wet hands, shape each half into a rectangle approximately 10-by-3 inches on the baking sheet, leaving at least 4 inches between the two (they will puff!).
  6. Make the middle layer:
  7. In a small bowl, mix the flour and salt.
  8. In a medium saucepan, heat the water, butter, and salt until the mixture comes to a boil.
  9. Add the flour mixture to the saucepan all at once, and stir until the mixture thickens and bgins to pull away from the sides of the pan. It should take less than a minute.
  10. Carefully transfer the mixture to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Beat at medium speed for about 1 to 2 minutes, allowing the mixture to cool some. If it is too hot, it will cook your eggs when you add them.
  11. Add sugar and beat until incorporated.
  12. Add the eggs one at a time, beating until incorporated. Continue beating the batter until each egg is totally absorbed and the batter no longer looks slimy.
  13. Add almond and vanilla extracts and beat until incorporated.
  14. Divide batter n half, spreading half of the batter over each of the dough strips on the baking sheet. They should be completely covered by the second layer of batter.
  15. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes until the pastry is a deep, golden brown and is very puffy.
  16. Remove from oven and transfer to a wire rack.
  17. For the top layer
  18. While still warm, spread each pastry with jam (I used strawberry for one and boysenberry for the other). The heat of the pastry should help the jam to spread. Sprinkle with toasted almonds (if using).
  19. Make the icing:
  20. Stir together powdered sugar, vanilla, and milk until it forms a thick, pourable icing. If the mixture is too thick, add another teaspoon of milk. If the mixture is too thin, add another tablespoon of powdered sugar.
  21. Drizzle icing over pastries and cut into strips to serve.

Notes

* Allow your pastry to cool a bit before drizzling the icing to get nice, clean icing drizzle lines (unlike some of us who don't seem to have the patience to do so).

* If desired, top with toasted almonds for extra crunch and almond flavor.

http://wee-eats.com/2015/07/19/almond-puff-loaf/

[ Recipe source: King Arthur Flour ]

 

grilled pineapple upside down cake

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Remember that mochi cake I made last week? Well, the reasons for making it were two-fold. First, I had been eyeballing that recipe ever since I got that book and, second, I’ve been planning to make this grilled pineapple upside down cake concoction for months now, and I required a cake or pound-cake-like substance to do it.

“Why on earth would someone grill pineapple upside down cake?” you ask? Well, why not? It’s summer and people are grilling things and grilling things is fun. The grill imparts a great toasty char and slightly smoky flavor to the cake and caramelizes the pineapple’s sugar, which take the cake up a notch and really just sings “summer”. Add to that a drizzle of homemade brown sugar sauce to take the place of the brown sugar glaze usually baked into the cake. Additionally, I replaced the bright maraschino cherries that are usually dotting the top of a pineapple upside down cake with a fresh cherry sauce, then finished it all off with some Talenti vanilla gelato. Any vanilla ice cream will do, I just happen to be a fan of Talenti.

I made this two ways, one as a “deconstructed cake” – layering the cake, pineapple, and sauces, with a scoop of ice cream on the side. Second, I made it as a parfait, just layering the components in a straight-sided glass. Neither was particularly photogenic. In fact, I could argue that they were both extremely UN-photogenic.

Apparently my 80-degree kithcen is not ice-cream friendly, which turned my parfait into soup in about three seconds flat. I remedied this by stashing my pineapple upside down parfait soup in the freezer to re-solidify and enjoyed it later. Despite not being much to look at, both were super delicious and I highly recommend them. If going the parfait route, though, be sure to chill your cake and pineapple first, to avoid ending up with soup.

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grilled pineapple upside down cake

Ingredients

  • 1 prepared pound cake or mochi cake
  • 1 pint vanilla ice cream
  • Coconut oil (I love this spray from Trader Joes, which is much cheaper if you purchase it at the store) or other neutral oil
  • For the pineapple:
  • 1 pineapple, cut into rings
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • For the cherries:
  • 1 pound cherries, washed and pitted
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean (or 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste)
  • zest from half of one medium lemon
  • For the brown sugar sauce
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 stick (4 Tablespoons) unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

Instructions

    For the cake
  1. Heat grill to medium-high heat.
  2. Cut cake into 1/2-inch thick slices and spray with oil or brush with melted butter.
  3. Cook over the grill until slightly charred, 2 to 3 minutes per side.
  4. For the pineapple
  5. Press pineapple into brown sugar on both sides, cover and refrigerate 30 minutes, or until ready to grill.
  6. When ready to grill, heat grill to medium-high heat and cook pineapple 2 to 3 minutes until grill marks appear. Flip and cook other side 2 to 3 minutes. Repeat on each side, pineapple should be slightly softened and charred.
  7. For the cherries
  8. Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan over medium-high heat.
  9. Cook for 20 to 25 minutes until the cherries are dark red and the sauce has thickened - when you dip a spoon into the mixture it should be coated with a relatively thick cherry coating when you pull it back out.
  10. Allow to cool slightly and transfer to a 8 ounce jar or airtight storage container.
  11. Will keep in the fridge up to 1 month
  12. For the brown sugar sauce
  13. Mix all ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring constantly, 5 to 10 minutes until thickened.
  14. Transfer to airtight storage container (I used 8 ounces but it probably made closer to 9 or 10 ounces of sauce).
  15. Will keep up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator.
  16. For the assembly
  17. Either as a parfait or sundae - with cake on the bottom, topped with brown sugar sauce, pineapple, cherries, and ice cream.
  18. Enjoy!

Notes

* The brown sugar sauce will solidify when chilled, but can be re-warmed in the microwave for about a minute to return to its liquid state. Allow to cool slightly before assembling.

* The cherries are also great for sundae toppings, mixed into yogurt, or to make home-made Shirley Temples... or just as a snack.

* Pre-assembled parfaits can be covered tightly with plastic wrap and stashed in the freezer until serving time.

http://wee-eats.com/2015/07/11/grilled-pineapple-upside-down-cake/

[ Cake from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream Desserts ]

[ Sauce adapted from Pioneer Woman ]

[ Cherries adapted from Bon Appetit ]

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jeni’s mochi cake

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When I first saw the recipe for Jeni’s mochi cake in her newest book, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream Desserts, I was instantly intrigued. Jeni chose this cake for her ice cream recipes because instead of hardening, the cake stays soft and chewy when frozen. At room temperature, the cake is springy, spongy, and delightfully chewy. Like the Japanese mochi, but in pound cake form.

You may recommend mochi from the toppings bar of your local frozen yogurt shop, or perhaps you’ve seen these glutinous chewy rice balls filled with ice cream at your favorite asian restaurant or grocer (Trader Joes even carries some that you can take home to try!). The rice flour keeps the center of this cake light and chewy while the sugar provides a gorgeous golden brown exterior, and the coconut and evaporated milks give the cake a wonderfully sweet, milky, almost tropical flavor.

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If you have never had mochi, you may be a bit scared when you cut into this cake. It’s a bit on the “springy” side, in that you can even pull at it a little bit and it will happily spring back to its original shape. I mean, it’s nothing crazy but it’s fun to play with and see that tiny tug will serve to stretch the cake rather than break it into pieces. It definitely serves to show this cake’s appeal as an ice cream mix-in.

So whether you plan to cut this into cubes and throw it into some ice cream (I would recommend subbing it for the shortcake in this recipe) or simply topping it with a scoop of your favorite store-bought ice cream, it’s a great way to switch up your typical ice cream routine. Jeni uses it to make mochi cake croutons and even toasts it on the grill (which is what I also did, coming up in the next recipe!).

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jeni’s mochi cake

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 60 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Yield: 1 9-by-5 inch loaf cake

Ingredients

  • 2 cups sweet rice flour
  • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/3 cups evaporated milk
  • 1 1/4 cups unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 5 1/2 Tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F. Butter a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan and line it with parchment. (Parchment optional, but recommended).
  2. Sift together the rice flour, sugar, and baking powder.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredient.
  4. Make a small well in the middle of the dry ingredients and pour the liquid mixture into the well.
  5. Fold wet ingredients into dry, mixing until fully combined.
  6. Pour batter into prepared loaf pan and bake for 60 to 70 minutes, until the cake is a deep golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out with just a few moist crumbs clinging to it.
  7. Cool cake in the pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to complete cooling.

Notes

To make Jeni's mochi cake croutons: Cut mochi cake into 1 inch cubes. Melt 1 tablespoon unslated butter in a large saute pan and add the cubes. Allow the cubes to cook undisturbed until they are golden brown on the bottom. Flip and repeat on each side until all sides are browned. Serve along with fruit as an ice cream topping.

http://wee-eats.com/2015/07/07/jenis-mochi-cake/

[ Recipe from Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream Desserts ]

 

blueberry crumb cake

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I would like to say that I knew July was Blueberry Month and that I made this recipe to be timely and trendy… I would like to say that I have my finger on the pulse of the food community and I was ready with blueberries for the month of July… but that would be a lie. I made this recipe because for some reason I thought that I needed the 5-pound clamshell of blueberries that I saw at Costco. I mean, it seemed like a good idea at the time.

After attempting to eat my way through said blueberries for a week, I still had at least two pounds left and was almost positive that if I ate one more blueberry I would go all Violet Beauregarde and Mr. Eats would have to roll me around until they finally found a cure for a blueberry overdose.

I thought about muffins and pancakes and even ice cream, but then I saw this post on my Facebook and I just knew. It was like love at first sight, but with coffee cake. I was pretty sure the cake-to-blueberry ratio was enough that it would allow me to still enjoy my remaining blueberries without becoming one.

I barely tweaked a thing and this recipe came out beautifully! The cake was super soft and springy, filled with bursting blueberries and topped with a crunchy, spiced crumb.

Make this for your 4th of July feast and your guests will beg you for the recipe. You could also make this for “national crumb cake day” which I am sure is a thing (or soon will be, if it’s not yet). These food ‘holidays’ are getting a bit out of hand…

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blueberry crumb cake

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 50 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Yield: 1 9-inch cake

Ingredients

    For the topping:
  • 5 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • Pinch of salt
  • For the cake:
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon table salt
  • 4 Tablespoons (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 cups (1 pint) fresh blueberries, clean and dry
  • 1/2 cup whole milk

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 375°F. Prepare a 9-by-2 inch round baking pan and line it with parchment.
  2. Make the topping:
  3. Stir together the sugar, cinnamon and salt.
  4. Using a pastry blender*(see note), cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Set aside.
  5. Make the cake:
  6. Take 1 tablespoon of your flour and toss it with your berries, set aside.
  7. In a medium bowl, whisk remaining flour, baking powder, and salt until combined.
  8. In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat butter, sugar and zest together until pale and well-mixed.
  9. Add egg and vanilla to the butter mixture and beat until combined. About now, mine started to really look like a batter.
  10. Add 1/3 of the dry ingredient mixture and beat on low until just combined.
  11. Add half of the milk and beat to combine. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl.
  12. Add another 1/3 of the dry mixture and mix until combined. Add remaining milk, mixing until combined.
  13. Add last 1/3 of dry mixture and beat on low just until incorporated. The batter will be stiff.
  14. Fold blueberries into cake batter until evenly distributed.
  15. Bake the cake:
  16. Scoop cake batter into prepared pan and smooth the top as much as possible, and sprinkle top of the cake with all of the streusel. Really pile it on here.
  17. Bake in heated oven for 40 to 50 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the cake comes out batter-free.
  18. Cool cake for 20 minutes in the pan before flipping it out onto a cooling rack. Removing the parchment paper lining, and flip the cake back onto a plate, being careful not to lose your streusel.
  19. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Notes

* Alternatively, you make the streusel by pulsing the flour, sugar, salt, and cinnamon in a food processor until combined. Add cubed butter and continue to pulse until the streusel has a sandy texture with pea-sized crumbs.

* You can be more or less generous with the blueberries in this recipe. I probably added two HEAPING cups of blueberries to mine in an attempt to work my way through as much of the remaining blueberries as possible. No blueberries? No problem, try this recipe with raspberries, blackberries, or whatever berries you have on hand!

* This cake can be stored wrapped in foil in the refrigerator for about 5 days, or you can freeze it tightly wrapped in plastic wrap, then foil, for up to three months. Thaw overnight before serving.

http://wee-eats.com/2015/07/03/blueberry-crumb-cake/

[ Recipe from Smitten Kitchen ]